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Post Anaesthetic Blindness & Gags in Cats

Post-anaesthetic blindness historically was thought to be associated with poor perfusion and oxygenation. However, a paper by Stiles et al in 2012 showed that the use of a mouth gag was a risk factor for blindness following anaesthesia in cats. The paper reviewed 20 cases of blindness. Three occurred following cardiac arrest. Of the remaining 17, all but one used a spring-held mouth gag at full extension. Their hypothesis that spring-held mouth gags can reduce blood flow to the brain by stretching of the maxillary artery was confirmed by Barton-Lamb et al in 2013. Happily 70% of these cats regained "useful" vision. However please consider avoiding the use of spring-held gags. And adopt

Rabbit Anaesthesia

Unless you are anaesthetising rabbits regularly, seeing a rabbit dental or ovariohysterectomy on your surgery list for the day may cause a restless night’s sleep. Added to this the pressure of working with a celebrity client (the Easter Bunny) creates another level anxiety. However being unfamiliar with the species is only part of what makes performing rabbit anaesthesia difficult. They are small, difficult to intubate and gain venous access. The anaesthetic protocols differ vastly from our more commonly anaesthetised dogs and cats. And there is limited literature describing anaesthesia and analgesia for domesticated (non-experimental) rabbits. Coupled with this rabbits often present for ana

Phone: 0424 973 038

Email: contact@vetanaesthesia.com.au

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